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Streaming Piracy to Total $52 Billion in Losses by 2022

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Worldwide revenue lost to online TV and movie piracy grew from $6.7 billion in 2010 to $31.8 billion this year, and will increase to $51.6 billion in 2022, forecasts London-based Digital TV Research. Those figures don't include online sports piracy.

Revenues from legitimate streaming sources overtook piracy losses in 2013, and since then the gap has been widening. Legitimate revenue totaled $6.1 billion in 2010, grew to $46.5 billion this year, and should hit $83.4 billion in 2022.

While the amount lost to piracy is increasing, Digital TV Research sees its growth rate declining thanks to government enforcement efforts and consumers getting easy and affordable legal streaming options.

While North America is currently the largest region for online piracy, Asia Pacific will take the lead in 2018. By 2022, that region's piracy losses will double to almost $20 billion. The top five countries for piracy loss are the U.S., China, Brazil, the U.K., and South Korea. The U.S. will stay in the top spot in 2022, Digital TV Research forecasts, while India—currently in the eighth spot with $700 million in losses—will climb to number 3 in 2022 with $3.1 billion in losses. China's efforts to reduce piracy will help legitimate revenues overtake losses by 2022.

This data comes from Digital TV Research's October 2017 piracy report, which sells for £1200.00.

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