HTML5 Track Coming to Streaming Media East

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Those who have questions about HTML5 video will want to block out May 10th and 11th on their calendars. Those are the dates of the 2011 Streaming Media East conference in New York City. Conference organizer Dan Rayburn, executive vice president at StreamingMedia.com, just announced that for the first time the conference will offer a fourth track entirely devoted to HTML5 video.

"The idea to have a whole track dedicated to the topic was because so many people have so many questions about HTML5. It seems like a natural fit," says Rayburn.

The track will run the full two days of the conference and will offer eight or nine sessions. Topics will include encoding to HTML5, encoding for Apple iOS devices, advertising and HTML5, how-to build an HTML5 player, and HTML5 standards. This fourth track will be available to attendees at no extra cost.

HTML5 sessions will focus heavily on teaching, with an instructor on stage showing attendees exactly how to work with HTML5 code. Rayburn adds that the track will also include presentations by vendors showcasing HTML5-based products.

Rayburn will announce more details about the track on Monday in his Business of Video blog. Anyone who'd like to speak on an HTML5 panel or be a presenter is invited to contact Rayburn through the blog. The program won't be finalized for another week.

This year's Streaming Media East will also include more hands-on opportunities with tablets and other devices, adds Rayburn, as well as several giveaways.

Rayburn believes that adding a hands-on HTML5 track will give the conference extra appeal to creative professionals.

"Part of the initiative of adding the HTML5-focused track is to bring in more agencies, developers, designers, and creative video professionals to the show," he says.

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