Video: How Much Comment Moderation Makes Sense for Live Streams?

Learn more about social streaming at the next Live Streaming Summit.

Watch the complete panel discussion from Live Streaming Summit, LS202. The Game of Social Strategy, in the Streaming Media Conference Video Portal.

Read the complete transcript of this clip:

Lauren Hallanan: Looking at the comments--I know that's a lot harder than data. You've got some great numbers, you can map everything out, right? But I really think that looking at the comments, and what people are saying during the stream, and the level of interaction between the streamer and the audience. If somebody is sending a comment, that means they're very engaged and focused on what's going on in the stream, right? That's a different level instead of just watching the stream. They want to talk to the streamer, they want to find out more, right? So measuring just the number of comments alone, is a really important data point. And then, also, looking at the comments. For example, are they talking about the brand, or the product, or the event that you're promoting, or are they just saying random things to the streamer? How relevant are the comments? Because that's very important, as well.

Dan Houze: How do you guys feel about moderating comments?

Lauren Hallanan: That's very important. All of our platforms, have moderation features, so that's definitely important.

Aaron Nagler: I don't know. I guess it depends on what the environment is and what kind of event you're holding. If it's a big conference or what have you, then yeah, of course, obviously. But again, it comes back to what I was saying before about trust and the relationship with the people. It's not self-policing, but it kind of is in the sense that, if you're gonna engage with a social streamer, you're gonna engage with someone who you're entrusting your brand to. Hopefully you've done your homework and you know what kind of person they are, and what kind of audience they have. It's a tricky spot for me. I've worked with brands back in Wisconsin, like brat companies and beer companies, etc. And I would probably listen a little bit if somebody said, "We are going to lord over your comments." Well, no, that's my audience. So while I think it's important, and obviously you don't want anything untoward out there. Again, it's about doing your homework and kind of knowing the person that you're engaging, and a level of trust. I think a big part of it is, the whole reason they have become popular, or they have an audience that you want to engage, is because those people trust the streamer.

Lauren Hallanan: But I think you have to have a basic level of moderation. For example, all of our streamers have the ability to appoint five of their loyal viewers--

Aaron Nagler: Deputize them? Yeah, that works.

Lauren Hallanan: To be what we call their "bouncers" and essentially they monitor the comments.

Aaron Nagler: That's their audience. That's their audience doing it.

Lauren Hallanan: Well, we also, obviously, we have a very large moderation team that we're also using AI algorithms to monitor. If we see things going on, then we'll be kicking people out as well. So I think that you don't wanna monitor extremely tightly, like you wanna be able to have conversation flowing, but you also need to have a basic level to make sure that things aren't getting out of hand, that there's nothing that's extremely violent, hate speech, things like that. We don't want that happening.

Dan Houze: I don't see any of that in a Bernie Sanders live stream. I've never seen any of that.

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