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MPEG is Closed; Want to Help Streaming Media Write the Story?

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For years, MPEG has been synonymous with its founder, Leonardo Chiariglione. Now, Chiariglione has resigned and MPEG is reportedly folded into parent committee SC29. Chiariglione explained the shuttering of MPEG in a post on LinkedIn on Saturday called "A Future Without MPEG."

By any estimation, MPEG’s contribution to the digital broadcast and streaming markets has been immense. We’re hoping to capture widespread thoughts on MPEG and Mr. Chiariglione and are seeking comments from people who interacted with MPEG and can share their perspectives on the following issues.

  • What does it mean that MPEG was folded into SC29?
  • What was MPEG’s impact in the audio/video codec space?
  • What were MPEG’s greats achievements?
  • What were MPEG’s greatest failures?

If you’d like to contribute please send no more than 200 words to janozer@gmail.com with a brief description of how and when you worked with MPEG or MPEG standards.

We’ll take contributions through June 26.

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