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NYU: Professors Need Guidance Adding Video to Lesson Plans

If anyone needs a reminder on how much easier is it to work with online video nowadays than previously, listen to Kristopher Moore, an instructional design specialist with academic technology services for New York University, talking at the recent Streaming Media West conference in Huntington Beach, California. Moore explained what a chore it used to be for professors to put video online for students.

"We had the opportunity to start from scratch. At NYU, we had a RealServer, so if faculty wanted to use video they had to take it to the library, bring the video, we had the RealServer, we had to transfer that, get it on our i4 account, give them an account as well, give them the link, they would have to put it in their Blackboard account. Then, they would have to provide access to their students, and they'd have to download a RealPlayer, and it had to be on a PC," Moore detailed.

Sure, everyone had a system like that nine or ten years ago, right? The thing is, this was only two or three years ago. NYU, which is regularly one of the top five most expensive colleges in the nation, had a cumbersome RealServer video system until only a few years ago. No wonder, Moore says, that most professors gave up and simply played a DVD in class.

With online video being a newcomer to the classroom, professors need a little extra guidance visualizing how to use it best.

"It takes some time for the faculty to realize 'This is how I want to use this tool,' because that didn't exist before," Moore explained. "You have to have a sit-down session with some of these faculty members and say, 'Now it's time to re-conceptualize how are you going to use this media,' because now you can lock it down to one, two, three; you can have contributors; you can have moderators; you can use this as observation assessment techniques."

For more advice on using video in the classroom, watch the full discussion below.

 

PRESENTATION: Reinventing Education With Video

Flipped classrooms, MOOCs, BYOD, personalized learning— are all new and exciting trends in today’s education industry. This session discusses how today’s leading educational institutions are transforming education with video and next- generation online experiences for YouTube generation students. Learn from universities about deployment challenges and how they can be overcome. Hear from those in the education market about the potential of these rapidly growing trends and what it means to the future of video in education.

Speaker: Perry Fetterman, Director of Customer Success, Kaltura
Speaker: Raul Burriel, Streaming Media Coordinator, Oregon State University
Speaker: Kristopher Moore, Instructional Design Specialist, Academic Technology Services, New York University

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