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Akamai Creates Broadcast Operations Center to Support OTT Video
With a dedicated team working around the clock, Akamai aims to monitor OTT delivery and squash problems the moment they arise.

To better support its over-the-top (OTT) video delivery customers, the content delivery network Akamai has announced the opening of its Broadcast Operations Control Center (BOCC) in its Cambridge, Massachusetts, headquarters. The center is staffed by a team that averages 12 but can expand up to 50 for major events.

The BOCC's team will use tools based on Akamai's Media Analytics offerings to monitor and analyze OTT quality for live, linear, and on-demand video. Alerts will notify the team of network disruptions, so they can troubleshoot and make corrections quickly. Akamai says it will work with each customer to create the right encoding profiles and player configurations for their needs.

“With the new BOCC, Akamai is helping to address consumer quality-of-experience expectations for OTT by raising our customer service, support, and component-level access into the CDN," says Matt Azzarto, Akamai's director of media operations and the BOCC's designer and manager. "We’re replacing help tickets and hold time with real-time communication and deep, proactive monitoring designed to alert customers to potential issues before they actually arise."

Akamai already runs Network Operations Command Centers (NOCC) and Security Operations Centers (SOC) to monitor global network conditions. The company is showing a model of BOCC at its NAB booth in lower South Hall.

 

Akamai's Broadcast Operations Control Center (BOCC)

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