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VideoRx's 2015 View From The Top
Robert Reinhardt, CTO VideoRx
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VideoRx is a boutique consultancy focused on the niche of making video actually work. That’s a lot more complicated than it may sound, given the massive variety of mobile and OTT devices in the hands of consumers today, in addition to desktop browsers.

We do everything within that niche, from architectural planning of entire video platforms, determining optimal encoding settings, configuring encoders and CDNs for efficient delivery, and engineering applications around video-centric experiences.

We provide enterprise-grade solutions to a wide variety of firms, from Microsoft and Apple, down to smaller businesses and startups. We implement a variety of technologies in our solutions, including open source tools such as FFmpeg as well as commercial technologies from Telestream, Teradek, and Wowza Media Systems.

Delivering video is a complex endeavor, with many challenges. From our perspective, some are more pressing than others, including:
Mobile Browsers: Most of our clients want to control the look and feel of video experiences on smartphones, but video just doesn’t work in mobile browsers all that well. Support for the HTML5 full screen API and inline playback is improving, but right now you need a native app to have the customizations that are relatively easy to achieve in desktop browsers.

H.265: It’s just not there yet. The industry wants early adopters, and by definition, someone has to pave a road. That someone is not a content provider, but the folks in charge of implementing video and audio decoders on devices and in browsers. Until Apple, Google and Microsoft begin to integrate H.265 decoders in their browsers and software, there’s not much point in deploying H.265 content.

Live Streaming: Many mobile devices now support live streaming in the browser, but sadly, the market is still reliant on technologies such as Adobe Flash Player to bring live streaming solutions to desktop browsers.

One of the trends we’re finding is that fewer content owners and delivery platforms appear to be concerned about DRM. Most of our clients don’t want to give away their content for free, but securing content to prohibit all but the elite hackers seems to be more important than a locked down proprietary DRM structure that requires native app support for mobile playback, and that’s a notable change in perspective from just a couple of years ago.

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