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TDG Finds a Significant Rise in OTT Living Room Viewing

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Compared to the previous year, TDG (The Diffusion Group) found that more than half of all adults with broadcast internet who viewed over-the-top (OTT) video on their televisions increased the amount that they watched. The survey, which questioned 2,012 U.S. adults in May, 2013, found that 24 percent reported they had increased their OTT viewing significantly from the previous year, while 28.5 percent had increased their OTT viewing slightly. TDG's survey, conducted through an online questionnaire, also found that 33.7 percent said their OTT viewing stayed the same, 5.9 percent said it decreased slightly, and 1.8 percent said it decreased significantly. Overall, connected TV viewers are six times more likely to have increased their OTT viewing time than decreased it, TDG reports.

The increases in OTT living room viewing were surprisingly large, notes TDG co-founder Michael Greeson. He points out that OTT viewing experienced a dramatic rise in a 12-month period when U.S. pay TV services counted strong losses.

The survey data comes from TDG's research study "Video Behavior in the Age of Quantum Media." TDG says the study looks at changes to a variety of video behaviors, and includes data on connected TVs, set-top boxes, and game consoles. The deliverables that comprise the study are available for between $4,000 and $7,000.

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