Streaming Media

 

Avid Study Points Way to Monetizing Multi-Screen Video
Online streams are a good way to build up traditional TV viewing, and people would happily pay for old episodes of favorite shows.

Professional video software company Avid has commissioned a study with Ovum that gives insight into how viewers enjoy streaming video and how content owners can best make money from it.

The study reinforced the value of multi-screen delivery as a way to drive traditional TV viewing. For example, it found that when experimenting with a new program, 29.5 percent of respondents try to record it to a DVR and watch it when they have time, while nearly 14 percent will try to find an online source for the show and watch it on their connected TV, mobile device, or computer. Once viewers are hooked on a new show, the number recording it to a DVR drops slightly (to 29.2 percent), while the number that makes sure they're home when the show comes on increases from 26.4 percent to 29.8 percent. The number of people who prefer streaming also increases, from nearly 14 percent to 15.8 percent. Binge viewers also make an appearance, with 4 percent of respondents saying they prefer to record all the episodes of a show and watch them all at once.

One of the more useful parts of the study looks at how much value consumers put on different types of video content. People see new Hollywood movies as the most valuable and would pay $3.63 to watch them. On-demand sports events come next at $2.37. Following that at nearly the same price level: favorite comedy and reality shows ($1.41), old episodes of favorite shows ($1.32), current dramas ($1.30), and HD news programs ($1.23). This shows consumers value old favorites higher than many would have guessed: 37 percent, in fact, would pay for old episodes of favorite shows.

Ovum conducted the study by surveying more than 3,000 consumers around the world. Avid isn't releasing the full study, but is offering a PDF highlighting five key insights from the report (free; registration required).

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