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Video: Is Smartphone Streaming Good for Live Video?
Kathryn Jones from VisualArts.tv, Scott Grizzle from IBM Cloud Video, and Brent Hieggelke of Brandlive discuss the consequences of proliferating live cellphone video and the resurgent "good enough for the web" attitude at Live Streaming Summit
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Watch the full panel presentation from Live Streaming Summit, The Future of Live Streaming, on the Streaming Media Conference Video Portal.

Read the complete transcript of this clip:

Kathryn Jones, VirtualArts.tv: Facebook just passed a new rule where they are now trying to ban the Facebook Lives that you might see that are single images, that people turn into polls. Because Facebook actually believes that live has a tremendous amount of value for a lot of the reasons that we're talking about here. But if people start to become accustomed to the fact that a Facebook Live can be that low quality, they're going to skip past those lives. And there is definitely a place for cellphone lives. In fact, I think one of the smartest commerce plays I've seen on Facebook is a woman selling pearls with her cellphone. It's brilliant. But that aside, mostly, the user experience is very poor quality. And in a world where it is a lean forward experience, where we're used to watching World of War, or whatever you call those games, I don't think that stands up. And I actually think the more we go back to streaming super cheaply with cellphones, the worse it is for the future of Live.

Scott Grizzle, IBM Cloud Video: Back in the early days of streaming, there was a term for all productions, "It's okay, it's only for the Web." And I think a lot of thinhs are going for that Web. Again, it's totally for the Web. But you tell that to Netflix, you tell that to Hulu, who are using all online video for delivery, it's not OK for just the Web. They need to go to all devices. When you shoot on a device that can play 1080p on your phone, but it's not designed to stream 1080p. People don't understand that. The standard to upload videos and record them and things, it's not made to be streaming. So your overall quality is going out still at 480p, maybe 720, if we're lucky, on some of the newer phones. Your overall quality will never be there. And, I mean, and you see a lot of people get the low-end gear, or they want to be Hollywood. I'm not knocking anybody who wants to go in, start out achieving growth. But, again, you've got to know how to light properly, do things and do the overall production, to get the same look and feel. And a cellphone, it's a CMOS chip, and it's going to flatten out the image.

Brent Hieggelke, Brandlive: When YouTube launched, they said video on the Internet was kind of novel. So people were okay with it. But now we're all used to watching great video on the Internet. So we expect live video to, basically, as we get through the novelty phase, be as good a quality. Some run a show with, really, some produced video in the middle, and just, really, it's gotta be a broadcast quality experience for most folks.

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